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Briefs: Fifty shades of kinky, medical pot reform

FIFTY SHADES OF US NOT BEING JUDGMENTAL ABOUT THIS ODD DEVELOPMENT

The runaway popularity of Fifty Shades of Grey, the erotic paperback that erupted onto the suburban literary scene late last year, has been a windfall for at least one local company that doesn’t peddle books or leather wear. Seeking Arrangement, a “dating” website that brokers relationships between sugar daddies and babies, reported a dramatic membership increase, fueled mostly by women seeking a submissive, dependent relationship like the one depicted in the mega-selling book, and its two mega-selling sequels. According to a press release, almost 200,000 women worldwide, and 3,187 in Southern Nevada, have logged on to the site in search of their own Christian Grey. Unfortunately, the website did not report a comparable increase in memberships by wealthy single men seeking bondage-curious women. So many of those would-be Anastasia Steeles may have to satisfy their fantasies between the covers of the book. AMY KINGSLEY

ACTUAL ACCESS

Assemblyman Tick Segerblom wants to fix Nevada’s medical marijuana laws once and for all.

Since 2000, cardholders have had the right to smoke the substance and possess small quantities of it, but had no legal way to obtain it. Under current law, dispensaries are illegal (as is street-dealing, obviously), so patients are required to grow their own. Still, a problem: How are they supposed to get the seeds?

Now-retired District Court Judge Donald Mosley declared Nevada’s medical marijuana law unconstitutional in May, and the case is now waiting to be heard by the Nevada Supreme Court.

On KNPR 88.9-FM’s State of Nevada, Segerblom said he hopes to model Nevada’s medical marijuana system after Colorado’s — which is carefully monitored by cameras and, unlike California and other 4:20-friendly states, turns a profit.

The Las Vegas Democrat hopes to introduce his bill to the Legislature next year. STAFF