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Briefs: Curl Up and Die reunite; Nevada has no creative class

CURL UP AND DIE IS BACK AND READY TO BLEED ALL OVER YOU

Curl Up and Die, one of our local hero bands from the Music Issue and the champion of hardcore bands across the valley, recently announced a return to the limelight. Sort of. The band has no plans to be the full-time touring, make-it-or-break-it Curl Up and Die that broke up in 2005. In fact, they won’t even live in the same city. Singer Mike Minnick is still living in Chicago, but flying home for rehearsals and concerts as needed.

The return came about while Minnick was at a Thrice concert in Chicago, and ended up singing with the band, something he used to do during CUAD’s heyday. “I dunno what happened, but I got super excited and jumped in the crowd,” Minnicks says. “It was maybe a minute, but it all came rushing back to me, how much I loved doing that.” Right now, the plan is to revisit all those old, heavy, complicated riffs from the old records and start thinking about planning local shows by the end of the year — though nothing is set in stone yet. “We want it to be small and all-ages,” bassist Geoff Bergman says. “Mike likes to be in there and bleed.” Commence wetting yourself. MAX PLENKE

WHAT DO WE WANT? A CREATIVE CLASS! WHEN DO WE WANT IT? AT SOME REALISTIC POINT IN THE FUTURE!

When The Atlantic Monthly’s urban-studies website, Atlantic Cities, posted a map of the 50 states, each a shade of purple, you didn’t have to know what the colors meant, or even the map’s topic, to see it didn’t portend anything nice for our state. Amid this patchwork of dark indigo shapes, there was Nevada, the only state rendered in the lightest possible shade. As we know, Nevada is rarely singled out like that for anything good. In this case, the map, posted by “creative class” theorist Richard Florida, purported to show each state’s share of this creative class, those hip, young knowledge workers who are the key to human survival. The darker a state’s purple, the higher its density of these saviors. According to Florida, there are some 40 million of these folks in the workforce, and apparently, damn few of them live here, Zappo’s and the Downtown Project notwithstanding. (See more at www.theatlanticcities.com.) “Maybe,” opined one wag we know, “Nevada really is a vast desert wasteland suitable for nuclear waste.” SCOTT DICKENSHEETS

DON’T JUMP!

Transportation planners intended the majestic Mike O’Callaghan-Pat Tillman bypass bridge at Hoover Dam to be an attraction for tourists and travelers as well as a highway for north and southbound drivers. Unfortunately, it has become a destination of a darker kind. Four suicides have happened at the bridge in the last four months, and they are becoming more frequent. This was totally predictable. Seven of the top 10 suicide sites are bridges, according to Wikipedia. Once a place gets a reputation for suicide, the number of suicides tends to increase. Experts warned that this might happen, and yet planners still chose not to install suicide barriers or emergency phones. They’re going to have to change that, and soon, before the bridge becomes a melancholy magnet. AMY KINGSLEY