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FOOD REVIEW: ROSE. RABBIT. LIE.

Jan 29, 2014 3:41pm

You have probably seen the billboards, the blogger posts, the banner ads, the news spots, and maybe even the TV commercials (apparently people still watch TV?). Even a faux demonstration of grammarians protesting the gross...

PIZZA MAKING ART

Jan 08, 2014 2:19pm
Chrome Werewolf
Chrome Werewolf
The Studio at Show Creators
The Studio at Show Creators
The Tone Factory
The Tone Factory
Digital Insight
Digital Insight

The Tone Factory

5329 Cameron St., 301-6964, www.thetonefactory.com

Is the local scene lucrative?

Vinny Castaldo: For me, I think I’m in a unique place because I’ve been in the local scene for 20 years. I know all the musicians and I grew up here. I kinda fit a niche where I have all the same quality gear as the Palms, but it’s owned by an indie musician, me.

How real is the threat of the bedroom musician?

I was the kid with the four-track recorder. There is a lot of people doing that, but they soon find out they can’t make it sound like a record, especially in a band situation. I usually end up fixing a lot of those. But it has put a dent in the recording industry as a whole. But that’s more on the rock side. Four-on-the-floor club stuff can be done at home. Not live instrumentation, though.

Who/what albums are you working with now?

Sleepy Brown’s album and The O’Jays.

The Studio at Show Creators

4465 W. Sunset Road, makesonicawesome@gmail.com

Is the local scene lucrative?

Eric Rickey: I think for a private studio, local bands provide more of a supplementary income. We do mostly commercial clients. The local bands we have come through us mostly through word of mouth, within the same circle of people that we know. We just opened. So hopefully there will be more local bands coming through. But we’d love to reach out even further than that.

For us, the production side is almost more important than the recording side. We really want to help bands lift their songs. Hopefully we will be able to attract bands from other states that are looking for a good musical experience, rather than a factory-like experience they might have in an L.A. studio.

How real is the threat of the bedroom musician?

The home recording market is both good and bad. It really hurts the places with the really high overhead. Those huge recording studios are closing left and right. Fortunately, there’s still enough business to support a small commercial place like ours. It’s only been open a few months, so I don’t know if it will be successful. I don’t really feel threatened by the home-studio market. I feel I have the skill set and musicality to bring something more to the product.

Who/what albums are you working with now?

We just finished the Most Thieves album. I’m in that band, too. It’s a really solid effort, a pretty high watermark. Dusty Sunshine is also working on their next EP in the studio. It is a much, much different product. The Most Thieves album is a real rock ’n’ roll record, and the Dusty stuff is all acoustic.

Digital Insight

2810 S. Maryland Parkway, 792-3302, www.digitalinsightrecording.com

Is the local scene lucrative?

Mike “Lazer” Lavin: Because we’re so old and we’ve been here so long, I’d say 95 percent of our income is local musicians. They come in for an hour, two hours, anything from demo hip-hop in our B Room where guys roll in with a bottle of Ciroq, to guys putting it in real in the A Room. They still pay their bill at the end of the session. B.B. [King] comes in twice a year. He likes our room.

How real is the threat of the bedroom musician?

It’s absolutely changed the demographic of the business. We at Digital Insight identify with that. All of us have rigs in our closets. But the thing that keeps the facility alive is, one, it’s hard to drag eight rappers into your parents’ closet, and two, I think people come here for the experience of the people running the equipment. We’re all road-hardened and battle-tested. We’ve almost become subcontractors for people’s home projects. They record from home and come here to mix. I’m very liberal about qualified engineers coming in to use our room to get an edge up on their project. I don’t care. They’re bringing business.

Who/what albums are you working with now?

The new Slow to Surface EP, and I just finished the Black Camaro record … and I did a Spanish voice-over for the Transformers movie.

Chrome Werewolf

1329 S. Commerce St., 553-9464, www.chromewerewolfstudio.bandcamp.com

Is the local scene lucrative?

Brian Garth: There are enough bands in Las Vegas to book a full bill every night of the week for a year and not have to watch the same band twice. I am fortunate enough to be getting by at Chrome Werewolf. I’ve definitely had some help along the way. If you record enough bands, they tell their friends, and they tell theirs. It ends up working out.

How real is the threat of the bedroom musician?

I love the home recordist. I was one. When home recordists get fed up with not getting the results they want, they come to me, and their own experience helps them in the studio. If anything, it makes it easier, sometimes. Say if a band has files already, it’s fun to work from someone else’s tracking. Sometimes they suck, sometimes they really know what they’re doing, and they just don’t realize it.

Who/what albums are you working with now?

I just finished a couple of songs for Pet Tigers. The songs are going on vinyl. Jack and the B Fish did 17 songs live that we’re finishing up the mixing on this week. Trevor and the Joneses have been laying down mad guitar tracks for their upcoming album. I have Close to Modern coming in this weekend, and a band called The Marquees coming in at the end of the month.

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