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FOOD REVIEW: ROSE. RABBIT. LIE.

Jan 29, 2014 3:41pm

You have probably seen the billboards, the blogger posts, the banner ads, the news spots, and maybe even the TV commercials (apparently people still watch TV?). Even a faux demonstration of grammarians protesting the gross...

PIZZA MAKING ART

Jan 08, 2014 2:19pm
Courtesy: Neon Museum
Courtesy: Neon Museum

Las Vegas history lovers are saddened by the disappearance of the Glass Pool Inn’s sign, which was supposed to be donated to the Neon Museum. The museum reported the sign missing last Thursday on its Facebook page, and as of today there are no leads.

The 1950s motel, which was famous for its above-ground pool, closed in 2003 and was demolished in 2006. The motel’s famous pool had large porthole-style windows that allowed passersby to see into the water, and was featured in movies such as Casino and Leaving Las Vegas. It was originally called the Mirage Motel, but changed its name to Glass Pool Inn in 1989 when Steve Wynn bought the Mirage name for the mid-Strip resort that exists today.

 The museum’s Executive Director Danielle Kelly said she received a call last week that the sign was gone. It had been taken down down in May of this year and was awaiting transport on the old motel site on Las Vegas Boulevard, across from Mandalay Bay. The museum does not pick up donated signs, so it was waiting for the owners to arrange delivery.

“The sign itself may not have been one of the more aesthetically pleasing, but its status as the last physical remnant and symbol for the Mirage Motel/Glass Pool Inn makes it an invaluable relic of the history of this community,” Kelly said. “Its location was so high profile — everyone knows the Glass Pool Inn. It’s a story people want to hear, and a story we would have been so thrilled to be able to tell at the Neon Museum and Boneyard. Its a loss for this community.”

More than 70 people shared the Neon Museum’s plea for information on Facebook, and fans expressed disappointment and shared memories in the post’s comment thread. Some reported that they had seen the sign being moved but didn’t realize it was being stolen. Others mentioned shards of blue plastic at the motel site that suggested rough handling. A few wrote that the sign had likely been dismantled and sold for scrap by now.

 “How could someone do this?” echoed throughout the posts.

Indeed, it’s a sad sign of the times.

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